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An S Corporation Tax Strategy: Can You Eliminate Current Income Taxes on Company Profits?

May 20, 2014

Filed under: Taxes — Tags: , , , , , , — Neel Shah @ 12:41 pm

In a recent article by the Wall Street Journal, a potential possibility for limiting tax liability is being considered on the heels of the two North Carolina business owners who are attempting it. Right now, the issue is being explored in U.S. Tax Court, too, where a previous decision in December issued a ruling in favor of business owners.

An S Corporation Tax Strategy Can You Eliminate Current Income Taxes on Company Profits
(Photo Credit: socaladvocates.com)

In an S Corp, which is typically how closely held firms organize themselves, earnings go directly from the company to the owners, who then have to pay taxes on their individual returns. This only works for companies with less than 100 shareholders, but it does provide a shield of corporation-like protection while avoiding an income tax at the corporate level.

Depending on how the court decides, there are major ramifications ahead for S corps. If the decision is handed down in favor of the corporations, these organizations may be able to reap significant tax savings by limiting their liability. In the North Carolina case, it’s all about how the owners structured their agreements. They reorganized the company into an S Corp in 1998 with a divided ownership strategy that gave 5 percent ownership to an ESOP. These assets can increase in value tax-free and allow for penalty-free withdrawals by individuals at age 59 ½ .

For tax purposes, nearly all of the profits from the corporation could have been shifted to the ESOP, putting off tax liability until individual withdrawal down the road. Many corporations are interested in mitigating risk and exploring tax reduction strategies, we can help with both. Email us at info@lawesq.net or contact us via phone at 732-521-9455 to get started.

Side Business? Silent Partner? What’s the Risk? Duties of non-manager members of LLCs

May 9, 2014

Filed under: Asset Protection,Asset Protection Planning,Estate Planning,LLCs — Tags: , , , , — Neel Shah @ 6:30 pm

If you are interested in creating a managed multi-member LLC, one of the most popular questions for individuals in this position is whether non-manager members are held to the same standards (or have the same liability) with regards to fiduciary duties like care and loyalty. The answer is “it depends”.

Side Business Silent Partner Whats the Risk Duties of nonmanager members of LLCs
(Photo Credit: serpent.com)

In the non-manager members are involved in some significant aspect of the business, the operating agreement should generally include an expression of such duties for these individuals. Looking at the landscape of typical non-manager member involvement in the business of these LLCs, significant duties are typically rare with smaller businesses that are closely held.

There are some cases where the operating agreement might not address this question specifically. In this scenario, the LLC act governs and can provide some important insight. A lot of these acts, however, are quiet when it comes to this particular question. Some agreements, however, do have specific information about these duties included. An example is the Delaware Limited Liability Company Act, which actually negatives any duties for the non-manager members unless an express clause in the LLC agreement states anything to the contrary.

LLC formation and agreement construction can be aided significantly with the watchful eye of an attorney. Call us at 732-521-9455 or send us an email to info@lawesq.net to discuss your needs.

Risky Business? Manage that Risk: Captive Insurance Companies

April 23, 2014

Filed under: Business Law,Business Planning,Business Succession Planning,Captive Insurance Companies — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , — Neel Shah @ 12:43 pm

A captive insurance company is a company created by a business owner to help insure risks of affiliated businesses. When set up appropriately, a captive allows a business to manage risks while allowing the affiliated company to reap benefits, too.

Risky Business Manage that Risk Captive Insurance Companies
(Photo Credit: business2community.com)

A Captive will receive premiums that are then invested as opposed to premiums sent to a traditional unrelated insurer, which are essentially “lost”. Over time, those premiums accumulate. In the event of a risk loss, the premiums are available to be paid for those self-insured losses, thus protecting the business’s bottom line. This crucial benefit is the biggest advantage for business owners.

A Captive can issue casualty or property insurance to protect against a broad array of risks. Where the business owner has the most potential to capitalize on this opportunity is through risk protection for those risks that are typically too expensive to coverage or uninsurable, period. With possible major tax increases coming in the future, the Captive Insurance company remains situated as one of the most effective solutions for business owners. Captive Insurance benefits go beyond tax advantages by providing business owners with opportunities in wealth transfer, estate planning, and asset protection, too.

At Shah and Associates, we work with you individually to determine how a Captive can best suit your business needs. With vast experience in the field, we have helped our clients use Captives to minimize taxes, protect assets, manage risks, and improve cash flow. We understand the peace of mind and confidence that comes from a comprehensive approach to risk management, and that’s why we remain committed to the business community.